What would you do? PDF Print E-mail
News - Final Word
Tuesday, 22 October 2019 11:15
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What would you do if you had courage? What would you have if you had courage? What would you be if you had courage?

Syndicated radio host, Ken D Foster, asks these questions in his ‘Voices of Courage’ show. He says that courage is not necessarily about jumping into the lion’s den. No, courage starts with truth and when you’re brave enough to face the truth in any situation, you redefine what is possible for you.

Courage is a change-maker, says Ken. When you tap into your courage and you change one thing, you change your consciousness and when you do that, everything around you will start changing.

According to Ken, being courageous is a skill set that you can develop. That’s what successful people have done; they’ve nurtured the courage to do things that they didn’t know how to do in situations where they didn’t know what the next steps were supposed to be.

“If you’re having trouble solving a problem or reaching a dream, the problem isn’t you. It’s that you haven’t yet installed the one belief that changes everything,” says Marie Forleo in her new book, ‘Everything is Figureoutable’.

Marie’s mom always told her, “Nothing in life is that complicated. You can do whatever you set your mind to if you roll up your sleeves.”

Marie, host of the award-winning show, MarieTV, is a Jersey-girl who says that her can-do attitude comes from her mother, a five foot three Italian mama that curses like a sailor and can stretch a dollar bill around the block, principally by collecting coupons. In one of the coupon drives Marie’s mother won herself an orange-shaped Tropicana transistor radio, which quickly became her favourite possession.

To know where her mother was, Marie used to listen for the sound of the radio. One day she came home from school and couldn’t find her mother. She heard the sound of the radio in the garden. On closer inspection she found her mother on top of the roof – fixing a leak!

Another day she heard the radio blaring from the back of the house and found her mother in the bathroom. She had removed all the old tiles from the walls and floor and was busy retiling.

Then came the day when Marie arrived home from school and the silence was deafening: No sounds to lead her to her mother. She found her mother in the kitchen with the Tropicana radio taken apart on the kitchen table. It looked like an operating room and her mother was fixing the broken radio.

This woman was high school educated and these were the pre-Internet search engine days. How could she possibly have known how to do these things? It’s because she believed that everything is figureoutable.

Marie says this proves how powerful our beliefs are: All problems and dreams are figureoutable. If a problem is not – it’s probably a rule of life, such as death, taxes or gravity. If a dream is not – you might not care enough. Then go find something you care enough about.

You see, it takes courage to face these truths. You have to be honest about what it is you care about as opposed to what other people expect you to care about. You have to learn what’s in your control and what’s not. Then ask yourself: What can I do now, given these circumstances?

Even though freaking out seems like an unavoidable response to a crisis that doesn’t seem to be in your control, it won’t do you any good. Your best strategy is to calm down and then shift your beliefs about the situation you’re facing to ones that rather empower you.

Marie says that in this process there are two viruses that can seriously derail you: The first one is “But I know this already”. When you think this, you disengage. Rather try to find a new angle and ask: What can I learn from this?

The second virus is “This won’t work for me”. The question should rather be: How can this work for me? Challenge your brain to find new connections.

When you believe that something can be done, girlfriend, you’ll find the courage to figure out how do it.

Like Roy T Bennett says, “Believe in yourself. You are braver than you think, more talented than you know, and capable of more than you imagine.”

 

© 2019 Die/The Bronberger